❯ Guillaume Laforge

Google-Cloud

Workflows patterns and best practices — Part 3

This is a three-part series of posts, in which we summarize Workflows and service orchestration patterns. In this third and final post, we talk about managing workflow life cycles and the benefits of using Firestore with Workflows. Use subworkflows and Terraform to manage workflow definitions If you’re not careful, the workflow definitions you create with YAML or JSON can get out of hand pretty quickly. While it is possible to use subworkflows to define snippets of a workflow that can be reused from multiple workflows, Workflows does not support importing these subworkflows. Read more...

Workflows patterns and best practices — Part 2

This is part 2 of a three-part series of posts, in which we summarize Workflows and service orchestration patterns. You can apply these patterns to better take advantage of Workflows and service orchestration on Google Cloud. In the first post, we introduced some general tips and tricks, as well as patterns for event-driven orchestrations, parallel steps, and connectors. This second post covers more advanced patterns. Let’s dive in! Design for resiliency with retries and the saga pattern It’s easy to put together a workflow that chains a series of services, especially if you assume that those services will never fail. Read more...

Workflows patterns and best practices — Part 1

For the last couple of years, we’ve been using Workflows, Google Cloud’s service orchestrator, to bring order to our serverless microservices architectures. As we used and gained more experience with Workflows and service orchestration, we shared what he had learned in conference talks, blog posts, samples, and tutorials. Along the way, some common patterns and best practices emerged. To help you take better advantage of Workflows and service orchestration on Google Cloud, we’ve summarized these proven patterns and best practices in a three-part series of blog posts. Read more...

Workflows Tips and Tricks

Here are some general tips and tricks that we found useful as we used Google Cloud Workflows: Avoid hard-coding URLs Since Workflows is all about calling APIs and service URLs, it’s important to have some clean way to handle those URLs. You can hard-code them in your workflow definition, but the problem is that your workflow can become harder to maintain. In particular, what happens when you work with multiple environments? Read more...

Build and deploy Java 17 apps on Cloud Run with Cloud Native Buildpacks on Temurin

In this article, let’s revisit the topic of deploying Java apps on Cloud Run. In particular, I’ll deploy a Micronaut app, written with Java 17, and built with Gradle. With a custom Dockerfile On Cloud Run, you deploy containerised applications, so you have to decide the way you want to build a container for your application. In a previous article, I showed an example of using your own Dockerfile, which would look as follows with an OpenJDK 17, and enabling preview features of the language: Read more...

Choreography vs orchestration in microservices and best practices

We went from a single monolith to a set of microservices that are small, lightweight, and easy to implement. Microservices enable reusability, make it easier to change and scale apps on demand but they also introduce new problems. How do microservices interact with each other toward a common goal? How do you figure out what went wrong when a business process composed of several microservices fails? Should there be a central orchestrator controlling all interactions between services or should each service work independently, in a loosely coupled way, and only interact through shared events? Read more...

A Cloud Run service in Go calling a Workflows callback endpoint

It’s all Richard Seroter’s fault, I ended up dabbling with Golang! We were chatting about a use case using Google Cloud Workflows and a Cloud Run service implemented in Go. So it was the occasion to play a bit with Go. Well, I still don’t like error handling… But let’s rewind the story a bit! Workflows is a fully-managed service/API orchestrator on Google Cloud. You can create some advanced business workflows using YAML syntax. Read more...

Monitoring Website Changes with Workflows Cloud Functions and Sendgrid

Every year in France, around mid-September, there’s a special weekend where everyone can visit some famous places, usually closed the rest of the year. That’s “Journée du Patrimoine”. For example, you can visit places like the Elysée Palace or the Matignon Palace, if you want to see where the French president, or the French prime minister work. However, for some of those places, it’s tricky to register online to book a slot, as there’s always a high demand for them. Read more...

Some beans and gems, some snakes and elephants, with Java 17, Ruby 3, Python 3.10, and PHP 8.1 in App Engine and Cloud Functions

Time to spill the beans and show the gems, to our friendly snakes and elephants: we’ve got some great news for Java, Ruby, Python and PHP serverless developers today. Google App Engine and Cloud Functions are adding new modern runtimes, allowing you to update to the major version release trains of those programming languages. In short, here’s what’s new: Access to App Engine legacy bundled services for Java 11/17, Python 3 and Go 1. Read more...

Schedule a Workflow Execution

There are different ways to launch the execution of a workflow. In previous articles, we mentioned that you can use the gcloud command-line tool to create an execution, you can also use the various client libraries to invoke Workflows, or use the REST API. A workflow itself can also invoke other workflows! But today, I’d like to tell you how to schedule the execution of a workflow. For that purpose, we’ll take advantage of Cloud Scheduler. Read more...